Libertas Scholars and Human Flourishing

Providence’s Libertas Scholars Program introduces students to writers and ideas that have shaped our world. As the world drifts towards ever-expanding government solutions to problems (which are, more often than not, created by the very same government), students become ready to apply their humanities backgrounds and economic skills to critique ill-advised approaches to modern challenges and suggest constructive ideas of their own.

Travel to conferences

Last summer, the Libertas group traveled to Rapid City, South Dakota, for their first experience with FreedomFest, a national conference organized by economist Mark Skousen. It was a wonderful experience, rich with speakers and lively debates.

As another summer approaches, so does a return to FreedomFest, this year in Las Vegas July 13-16. With a lineup including comedian and actor John Cleese, former presidential candidate Andrew Yang, Forbes editor Steve Forbes, former presidential  economics advisors Art Laffer and Stephen Moore, actor Ben Stein, writer Eric Metaxas, “Words and Numbers” podcaster James Harrigan, and Senator Rand Paul, this year’s FreedomFest offers a select group of Providence Libertas Scholars plenty of intellectual food for thought. Students will have many options at a buffet of over 200 speakers, movie shorts, debates, and discussions.

Eliana, Jackie, Avala, and Teleios at Mt. Rushmore
Liza’s selfie with Senator Mike Lee and his wife, Sharon at Freedom Fest

Participating in community events

As everything opened up this April, a group of Libertas Scholars attended the Reagan Ranch Center’s Ronald Reagan birthday bash with Dennis Quaid; a few weeks later, ten students took in a fact-filled defense of school choice by Corey DeAngelis at a YAF luncheon.

Honors scholarship

All Libertas Scholars have been engaged in reading, discussing, and writing about a series of books during the year, including (but not limited to!) Silence, by Shusaku Endo, One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich by Alexander Solzhenitsyn, Jay Richards’ Money, Greed, and God, and Henry Hazlitt’s classic Economics in One Lesson. These four books taught students about the persecution of Christians in medieval Japan, life in a Soviet gulag, a Christian defense of free markets, and Hazlitt’s one simple lesson of economics, applied to a plethora of examples, written 70 years ago but just as relevant today.

Looking ahead

As Mr. Jamie DeVries transitions to head this program during the 2022-23 school year, we anticipate a host of opportunities for students to learn how a deep understanding of the ideas of our Founders, combined with robust entrepreneurship, will help Providence students continue to vigorously promote human flourishing.

Bruce Rottman
Bruce Rottman

Bruce Rottman teaches humanities, economics, and government in the Upper School and is the founding director of the Libertas Honors Scholars Program.

Bruce Rottman Announces His Retirement

Bruce Rottman

Bruce Rottman, Upper School humanities, economics, and government teacher, plans to retire from full-time classroom teaching at the end of the current school year. Mr. Rottman joined the Providence Hall faculty in 2009 and has played a pivotal role in Providence School’s development and flourishing.

Bruce Rottman
Bruce Rottman

A fulltime high school teacher since 1980, Mr. Rottman has enjoyed 42 consecutive years fulfilling his lifelong passion to teach. His career has taken the Muskegon, Michigan native to both Christian and independent schools in Florida (Naples Christian Academy), Northern California (Contra Costa Christian School), Washington (Lynden Christian School), Wisconsin (Brookfield Academy) and finally, southern California (Providence School). 

“I am grateful God has granted me all these years and incredible opportunities to shape the minds and hearts of the next generation,” says Mr. Rottman. “I have had the privilege to not only guide young minds in how to think, but I’ve also been able to guide them as they discern what to think about the topics I believe are noble, virtuous, and important to advancing God’s Kingdom.” 

A dynamic classroom teacher

When Mr. Rottman joined Providence Hall, the high school, founded in 2007, was still in its start-up phase. “Under God’s providence and through the persistent effort of our board members, administrators, faculty, and supporters, we have created a wonderful school that provides stellar opportunities for students to engage with great ideas, grow spiritually, and develop the skills and habits that will serve them well in college and throughout their lives,” he reflected.  

Rod Meadth, Upper School principal, says he expects Mr. Rottman’s retirement will bring mixed emotions from the faculty and student body. “Bruce has been a pillar of our teaching community over the years, with many students attesting to his good influence in their lives. Students coming up may be disappointed to learn he is retiring, but we can’t expect him to teach forever! After 42 years of devotion to his craft and hundreds of students having passed through his classroom, he has earned a rest. But I know that the lives he has shaped will continue to pass on that good influence in their own families, businesses, and communities. Bruce is passionate about building the Kingdom of God with excellence and understanding, and he can be proud of having done just that. This is his legacy.”

Mr. Rottman looks forward to whatever the future holds outside the classroom, which is likely to be a combination of consulting, part-time teaching, writing, creating art, renovating an older home, and spending time with his family. To ease into retirement, he has accepted a one-year position to launch a free market institute and teach a dual-credit economics class at Brookfield Academy, in conjunction with Concordia University Wisconsin.

“I will never retire from sharing my passion for liberty and sound economics and how those ideals reduce poverty and contribute to human flourishing,” Mr. Rottman says. “Without a doubt, I remain committed to the Providence mission and to seeing the school I’ve been privileged to help build succeed at every level. I am confident God has provided an excellent new faculty member in Jamie DeVries, who will bring his own mix of talents and skills to benefit our students.”

A Patriots fan to the core.

Thinking Critically about Critical Thinking

Critical Thinking: The ability to skillfully conceptualize, analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and apply information. Involves identifying the validity of facts and sources presented and reading critically.

– One of 16 Habits of the Mind Providence School seeks to develop in our graduates

A student once asked me whether I peppered my wife with scores of probing questions at home. No doubt, he was feeling sympathy for anyone else who had to endure my skewering train of inquiry. Perhaps he imagined this dinner table conversation:

WIFE: “So, honey…how was your teaching today?”

ME: “Well, dear,” I answer in this imaginary conversation, pointing my fork at my wife, “it depends on how you define ‘teaching.’ What exactly are you asking me? Why do you bring it up?”

I assured my student that my wife and I never—well, seldom—have such conversations. Just because students frequently give me squinty-eyed gazes, or complain their heads hurt after enduring my series of probing questions, does not mean asking questions is all I do. But it is an important part of my work as a teacher. A bit like running laps or doing push ups, being pushed through the hoops of this mental exercise can be painful, but the results are worth it.

Thinking well about important things

We need to enrich the definition of critical thinking, particularly in a distinctly Christian school, such as Providence. Many schools do a good job, overall, of teaching and modeling how to think clearly, deeply, and well. Beyond that, though, it’s important we help students recognize the importance of what topics and questions they are thinking about. While gossipy pop-culture sound bites may be appetizing, what we’d really like students to encounter is what is good, true, and excellent.

Thinking virtuously

Besides nudging students to think about important things, we also mustn’t assume all deep thoughts are equally virtuous. It’s quite possible that a well argued, logically constructed, articulate argument for infanticide is more dangerous than a sloppy argument for that abhorrent practice. Again, it’s not just how we think but what we think about that is important. We teachers strive to cultivate virtue: we prepare the soil, plant seeds, water, fertilize, and—ouch!—prune. The goal of practicing critical thinking is not to deconstruct students’ views on the big issues of the day and leave those views chaotically disassembled in a heap on the floor; it is to create something beautiful—that is, well ordered, well oriented, and God-honoring.

In our era, ever-shorter attention spans combined with political and social polarization leave us trapped in a cultural war where sound bites are weaponized and thinking is itself aborted as soon as we encounter a view we don’t like. The wonderful thing about a distinctly Christian education is that it provides the antidote to this cultural poison. Christian thinkers don’t ignore the big issues; with Scriptural truths in one hand, and a newspaper (or a mobile device) in the other, we clarify definitions, examine assumptions, and explore consequences for all sorts of questions.

For example, what exactly is “justice?” Or “social justice?” Is there a difference? And how did esteemed thinkers of the past (Plato, Aristotle, Old Testament prophets, Augustine, Locke) view justice? One of my favorite economists, Frederic Bastiat, said justice is the “absence of injustice,” and the sole function of laws is to create the absence of injustice. What does that mean, and is that true?

Bringing this train of thinking closer to the students’ own world, what does justice have to do with the student debt crisis? With earning a higher minimum wage for a summer job?

(Is your head hurting now? My long suffering wife does listen to me practice this sort of musing—a lot.)

Creating mental muscle

Plowing through a cascade of questions creates a sort of mental muscle, tempered and shaped by Scriptural truths. I never tire of reminding students that in the first few chapters of Genesis, two central truths stand out:

1) As image bearers of God, humans deserve dignity.

2) As sinners, humans are ever prone to selfishness.

So, how do those two truths enlighten our understanding of justice? Equality? Politics? Theology? Cinema? Music? Art?

Critical thinking nourishes civil debate while developing spiritual virtues, and therefore is an essential part of a distinctly Christian education. Regrettably, such a form of critical thinking is a rare experience in today’s educational landscape. 

In I Thessalonians 5:21, the Apostle Paul admonishes us to “test everything” and our Christian school classrooms are excellent places to do just that. Grounding excellent reasoning with Scriptural truths is an exercise—a habit of the mind—that shapes students’ minds and hearts. I hope and pray such habits will help students transcend our superficial and polarizing culture.

Bruce Rottman
Bruce Rottman

Upper School Humanities Teacher

Bruce Rottman teaches humanities, economics, and American government and directs the Libertas Scholars Program at Providence School. He loves helping students develop their critical thinking skills by posing provocative questions that will lead them to a greater understanding of human flourishing.